Tie Dye Cake with Mirror Glaze

Part of why I blog and share my bakes with people is because I want to share the good with the bad. So many blogs make all these different baking fads look SO easy, when in reality, they aren’t that cut and dry.

I love how this cake LOOKS, but hindsight being 20/20, I would have used a different cake recipe to get the tie dye effect, I would have chosen to go with a different type of cake for the mirror glaze effect and I would have just frosted my bad-ass white cake and mowed down. Ok…let me break it down for ya.

Tie Dye Cake

This is actually not tough. You could, in the spirit of efficiency, simply take a store bought white cake mix and dye it a bunch of colors and just scoop the different batters into a pan. I, of course, wanted to make everything from scratch, so I opted for a white cake recipe that I’ve used in the past. I didn’t stop to think about the fact that the cake gets its super moist consistency by folding in egg whites. When you separate the batter and you add dye…you have to mix the batter EVEN MORE…thus resulting in a denser cake because you have effectively removed all the lovely air you incorporated into the batter by folding in the egg whites. WHOOPS. My mistake.

If you love a great basic white cake, then here is the recipe I usually follow. A couple notes on the recipe. One, it’s not a snow white cake (for that, you have to sub out the butter for shortening). You can make it lighter in color by whipping the butter and sugar a tad longer. Also, be sure you are using clear vanilla extract…otherwise, you are adding additional color to the batter that will make it more ivory in color. Because I was adding dye to the batter anyway…it hardly mattered the color. I just wanted a light batter that would take the dye easily.

After I folded in the egg whites (I only partially folded them in, realizing at this point, I had chosen the WRONG batter for a tie dye cake), I split the batter into four parts. I dyed each one with a different color (hot pink, blue, orange and purple). It’s always best to use gel dyes as they won’t add any additional liquid to your batter, but if you use a liquid dye, just use it sparingly.

After I gave my bundt pan a generous rub down with Crisco, I layered in the different color batters. I didn’t do it neatly as that’s part of the appeal of a tie dye cake. I started with hot pink, then orange, then blue, then purple. After I was done, I took a cake spatula and very gently ran it through the batter a few times to swirl things up. I didn’t want to do it too much and then have a gray batter (a very unappetizing color!).

I baked the bundt cake for about 30 minutes (just until a pick came out clean) and let it cool for about 10 minutes. I turned it over, wrapped it in parchment and saran wrap and popped it into the freezer to cool down (why? because a frozen cake helps the gelatin in the mirror glaze set immediately).

Mirror Glaze

As I mentioned earlier, I would have glazed a different kind of cake. But, for my first time making a glaze, I think the cake came out beautiful. A bundt cake is hard to get the coverage from the glaze (and as I didn’t have a frosting base for it to adhere to, it was more transparent that it might have otherwise been). That being said, I think the cake was quite pretty.

I follow this recipe for the mirror glaze. It was easy to make, but let me tell you…this was one of the messiest projects I have ever undertaken. It requires quite a few dishes…and quite a bit of effort, but the end result is pretty WOW.

I actually strained my glaze twice to make sure it was perfectly smooth. I strained the first time just beforeΒ it was going into the bowl of white chocolate chips. After the chips were melted and stirred in, I strained a second time to get the waxy bits that didn’t fully incorporate out of the mixture.

I set aside 1 cup of the mixture and I dyed it black (using gel dye – definitely recommend GEL for this recipe). The bulk of the mixture I died hot pink (again, using gel dye. I use all the Wilton paste dyesΒ – you can get them at any local craft store like Michael’s or AC Moore).

I had to get creative with my bundt cake as you need to raise the cake so that the glaze drips off its sides. So I grabbed a glass tumbler from the cupboard and set it in the middle of a sheet pan. I then took my bundt cake and lowered it over the glass tumbler (as it was frozen, it didn’t break the cake) until it was snug, but not tight.

I poured the glaze over the top of the cake slowly. I quickly realized I would need to glaze it twice, so rather than make another mix, I simply moved the cake to a clean sheet, and upended the sheet pan and poured the glaze that had pooled in it back into the bowl. Then I started the process again with a second glaze. After that, I took my black glaze and using a small spoon, I streaked the black glaze across the top of the hot pink. The end result looks pretty awesome, if I do say so myself!

 

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